Uno Card Games Salisbury NC

Uno is one of the most classic card game in the world. The four-colored card game is simple to learn, but strategizing and thinking ahead is a huge part of being successful. It has become a staple of nearly any family game night and is popular among people of all ages. Read on to know more.

Hobby Shop
(704) 855-3611
958 Webb Rd
China Grove, NC
 
High Speed Hobbies
(704) 855-2940
2510 South Highway 29
China Grove, NC
 
ZNZ Hobbies
(336) 249-6127
972 Talbert Blvd
Lexington, NC
 
HobbyTown USA
(704) 799-9332
168-W Norman Station Blvd
Mooresville, NC
 
Stitchin' Post Gifts
(704) 637-0708
104 S. Main St.
Salisbury, NC
 
Little Choo Choo Shop
(704) 637-8717
500 S. Salisbury Avenue
Spencer, NC
 
Chuck's Trains
(704) 855-7245
129 S Central Avenue
Landis, NC
 
Lanier Hardware
(336) 248-5935
218 S Main St
Lexington, NC
 
Critters NC, LLC
(704) 636-5669
125 South Main Street
Salisbury, NC
 
Bijoux Collection
(704) 633-0034
125 North Fulton Street
Salisbury, NC
 

Uno: A Brief History of the Classic Card Game

uno card Uno: A Brief History of the Classic Card GameSince 1971, the card game Uno has been popular among families everywhere. The four-colored card game is simple to learn, but strategizing and thinking ahead is a huge part of being successful. It has become a staple of nearly any family game night and is popular among people of all ages.

Uno was invented in 1971 by a man named Merle Robbins. Supposedly, he had an argument with his son about the rules of another popular card game, Crazy Eights.

As a resolution to the disagreement, Robbins invented a new card game and dubbed it “Uno.” This makes sense as the game is very similar to Crazy Eights. The player has to match the color or number played before him or her. There are wild cards, essentially taking the place of the “crazy eights,” but there are several other action cards that distinguish Uno from its inspiration.

After becoming the card game of choice of the Robbins’, the family saved up $8,000 and manufactured the first 5,000 Uno decks, selling them out of Merle’s barber shop. By 1981, the game was hugely popular, so Merle sold the rights to the game to International Games for $50,000 plus royalties. The card game is now produced by Mattel and is still going strong.

In lieu of the success of Uno, there have been countless versions of the game, similar to the editions in Monopoly. These versions range from Peanuts Uno to NSYNC Uno. There is also a version of Uno for various sports teams, mostly from the MLB and NFL. There have also been various spinoff gam...

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